July 7, 2008

Why Burn Bridges?

Posted in On the Job tagged , , at 10:00 pm by Katelyn

I have read several articles and overheard one conversation recently about companies that do not wish their employees well when they move on to bigger and better jobs/positions.  I am floored by this attitude!  The management at companies like these take a resignation very personally rather than understanding that it’s just business.  In many situations, I think employees have no choice but to move out in order to move up.

Perhaps I am naive, but I always thought that if you performed your job well, took a new job because it was a better fit or an advancement for your career, gave your employer ample notice, and resigned by thanking them for all they taught you, then an employer should be happy for you and happy to provide a great reference.  I guess the companies mentioned above must be the best places ever to work if they think that no one should ever want to leave.

Doesn’t this situation go against the very core of what business is?  I am always thinking to the future and therefore try to hold all contacts close and not burn bridges because you never know when that contact may have something you need.

Have you ever worked for a company like the ones mentioned – who are offended rather than supportive when an employee is ready to move on?  Or have you had a great experience with moving on to a new position?  I am curious to compare my own GREAT experiences with yours and see which is more common.

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March 18, 2008

Organizing your networking

Posted in Careers, Life, Uncategorized tagged , , at 9:01 pm by Katelyn

Whether it’s an old-fashioned Rolodex, a nifty binder of business cards, an extensiveRolodex Outlook address book, or a self-made spreadsheet, keeping a running list of contacts is essential for any career-oriented person, especially Millenials who are just starting out and will change jobs frequently.  Networking, in my opinion, is the best and most successful way to find a job.  Most employers would rather hire someone who comes with a recommendation from one of their contacts than someone they don’t know.  That means, every business card or person you meet should be entered into some sort of database.

Right now my personal contact database is in a variety of locations.  I have a personal address book, an old-fashioned Rolodex, and my Outlook address book for work.  I’m looking to stream-line my office space and am undecided as to the best way to organize all the contact information I’ve gathered.  I am leaning toward keeping my Rolodex as a place to store the business cards I collect and creating a spreadsheet where I can easily search for information.  It should include how I met each contact, their field of work, and the date at which I last spoke or met with them.

Do you have a set system for keeping track of all your contacts?