March 6, 2008

Honoring Hen: Marin Alsop

Posted in music, Music Industry, Uncategorized tagged , , , at 10:01 pm by Katelyn

The name Marin Alsop probably doesn’t sound familiar to most people. Even I only knew her story and not her name. She is the woman who broke the glass baton so to speak.

Alsop is the Music Director and Principal Conductor of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and the first woman to ever lead a major American Symphony. In the world of classical music, where men still dominate the scene, she has broken through.

I won’t bore you with biographical details because she has so much of her life still to live. I will instead leave you with several of her quotes that I think speak to her character and the opportunity she has earned.

“I think the most challenging aspect is people’s need to focus on the fact that I’m a woman. It’s really entirely irrelevant to what I do.”

“I don’t want to give it short shrift. I want to take this responsibility of being a role model, in a certain way, and try to capitalize on it and make it easier for future generations and really make a contribution because of this circumstance I find myself in.”

“In some ways, it’s really a shame that it can be the 21st century and there can still be firsts for women. That’s disappointing. But at the same time, I’m proud. I want to try to use this opportunity to pull a spotlight onto the fact that there can still be firsts for women and we need to work harder to make those part of history, rather than part of the present.”

(quotes taken from CNN article: http://www.cnn.com/2007/SHOWBIZ/Music/09/23/alsop.baltimore/index.html)

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December 18, 2007

Location v. Career

Posted in Careers, Life, Music Industry tagged , , , at 3:58 pm by Katelyn

Yesterday on The Simple Dollar, Trent Hamm continued his review of What Color Is YourParachute? with chapter 8: How To Pick a New Place to Live. I think the choice between moving somewhere new for a job or moving somewhere new for the location is one that a lot of twenty-somethings face. I know that I have. Depending on your field and your preference for location, it could be a matter of choosing between your career and your happiness. For instance, in the music industry, you are very limited in your choice of locations for work. It’s New York, L.A., or Nashville, unless you luck out in finding one of the few jobs scattered in other cities across the country. What if your family, or your heart is in a smaller town or different geographic location? Do you sacrifice location for building your career? Will you be as happy with work accomplishments if there is no one around to celebrate them with? Or do you justify it by telling everyone that the sacrifice is temporary?

All of these are questions that I have struggled with at one point or another. My heart is inUS Map another part of the country, but I find that the job market is so much better in the bigger, more prestigious cities. At this point, I have sacrificed location for building my career. And don’t get me wrong, D.C. is a great place to live and I never lack for things to do. I would not be opposed to staying here, but I could enjoy even more if I had someone to share the city with. I would say that I am becoming a believer in the idea that choosing a location before choosing a job leads to happiness. Anyone can make do where they are, but I think that if you love the city you’re in, everything else will fall in to place and you will make your career happen.

Why do you live where you live? Do you think choosing location over career makes any difference in happiness or satisfaction?

~DC